The WalkMan

Meritocracy, written by the history.

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By the 20th century, it was said that the poorest societies are those who have not finished (or have not even started) the technological era or the Industrial Revolution. But, looking from a wider perspective, history reveals that India and China had been dominating the World for many more centuries than the today’s so-called First World, just before the US and Europe golden age. Then, Industrial Revolution should not only be seen as a development indicator but also as a historical milestone that has driven us to a new world order.

Source: Angus Maddison

Going forward in time, in the 21th century and after some kind of trigger, it is observed that world economy powers are shifting. The great western powers are fast losing its pre-eminence to be replaced by new emerging powers such as Asia – China and India are not new ones, but rather be again – , Africa and South-America.

A new landmark: the collapse.

Africa and South-America are in a paradoxical position. They are two of the poorest regions on the Earth but more than a third of natural resources in the planet and more than half of arable land are placed there. This great amount of resources have not helped them to grow at the same pace as wealthier countries did. Actually, the gap among different worlds has been even increased.

Certainly, First World growth and Capitalism have gone, hand in hand. The evolution of the system has driven social consumer trends to increasingly be more more selected and complex. At the same time, technology has been providing society with facilities unimagined until today.

 Undoubtedly, these new amenities have enriched the First World, but have also aged and diminished its population, driving the system to the collapse. Capitalism requires a dynamic and consumer society and mainly the youngest people are. The Third World is full of young people and the First World is urged to invest in these underdeveloped places, waiting for new consumers of capitalism, which is highly developed in the western powers. Unexpectedly for them, this investment may reverse the world order.

Into the wild

A key principle of technology market is that when a technology is beginning to develop in a region, the most advanced one is actually deployed. Therefore, growing economies are most convenient places for high-tech companies since they can launch trials without any kind of risk – lack of technology enhances fault tolerance – .

Having reached the collapse, there is a silent technology transfer from First to Third World that will be increasing global rivalry, equality, and eventually, success comes from meritocracy instead of speculation.

The World getting into the wild is good news, since the more difficult environments, the better opportunities.If equality brings meritocracy, meritocracy will bring justice. As Charles Darwin said:

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change.

 

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